Alabama execution called off as death warrant expires after 'issues accessing veins'

Hours after approval from a divided U.S. Supreme Court, the state of Alabama called off the execution of Alan Eugene Miller citing issues accessing his veins and time restraints.
Alabama Department of Corrections (ADOC) Commissioner John Hamm said there were issues accessing Miller's veins and the lethal injection protocol was not going to complete before the death warrant expired at 11:59 p.m. Thursday, according to Fox 6 in Birmingham.
Miller is reportedly alive and back in his cell at Holman Correctional Facility.
Hamm also told media that an ambulance did leave the prison, but it was unrelated to the execution, the outlet reported.
Kay Ivey released a statement early Friday morning shortly after ADOC announced the execution had been called off.
Ivey's office said she anticipates the execution will be reset at the earliest opportunity.
JUDGE BLOCKS ALABAMA FROM CARRYING OUT LETHAL INJECTION AFTER INMATE SAYS STATE LOST HIS PAPERWORK"In Alabama, we are committed to law and order and upholding justice.
We all know full well that Michael Holdbrooks, Terry Lee Jarvis and Christopher Scott Yancey did not choose to die by bullets to the chest."
The execution by lethal injection was ultimately approved by the Supreme Court in a 5-4 decision Thursday evening after lower courts previously ruled against the execution going forward.
The point of contention was a claim by Miller's attorneys saying the state lost paperwork requesting an alternative execution method.
STATE ASKS TO DISMISS LAWSUIT AIMED AT BLOCKING EXECUTION OF ALABAMA INMATEEach man was shot multiple times and Miller was captured after a highway chase.
Trial testimony indicated that Miller killed the men because he believed they were spreading rumors about him, including that he was gay.