Afghan translator expresses gratitude for daughters' education, first Thanksgiving in America

Johnny arrived with his family at his new North Carolina home back in October.
Today, his young daughters are already getting something they never would have received under the Taliban: an education.
TALIBAN’S NEW MEDIA GUIDELINES BAN TV DRAMAS WITH FEMALE ACTORS, MAKE WOMEN JOURNALISTS WEAR HIJABS"They’re happy and they’re excited," said Johnny.
"Every morning … 6 o'clock in the morning, my two daughters, they wake up and get ready … just come into my room and wake up us."
"They keep asking, 'We want to go to school, we like school.
His daughters have been welcomed at their new school in Weddington, North Carolina, and embraced by the community, where many of the soldiers Johnny once served alongside now live.
"The moment they pulled up, it got to be so quiet like you could hear a pin drop.
They play soccer on the same team as the daughters of Sgt.
Johnny served as a translator for Verardo, who lost his leg in Afghanistan's Arghandab Valley in 2010 and suffered a traumatic brain injury.
Their girls went trick-or-treating for the first time and now have play dates after school.
"A hijab … [Muzhdah] said, I'm not going to do that.
"I'm grateful for this first Thanksgiving I'm here with my family."